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    How to create the perfect outdoor garden room.

    Many people strive to create the perfect outdoor garden room. The feeling of the “inside outside” is one, that I believe has childlike qualities about it. We all still like den building. It brings out the child in us. That ‘womb like’ feeling of safety. To take the components of an inside space and bring them outside creates magic. To have a lounge without a ceiling, that is open to the elements provides an exciting, enchanting space. Here we look at six pointers to get you started on that ideal garden room.

    6 easy steps for creating the perfect outdoor garden room


    Wrap it around.

    First and foremost, It’s seems obvious, but set aside an area that is enclosed. Make some walls. Give it a roof if necessary, it could be the shade sail, climbing plant or partially cover it with timber. Once you get the feeling of enclosure, intimacy will prevail and give you that sancturary you are striving to create. Suddenley your outdoor room is created and from here on in you just need to decide how you will add your personality.

    Light it up.

    Many people overlook garden lighting. It can set the mood. More importantly, It is probably the single biggest thing you can do in the garden. It will increase the usability of the space into the night. It will lengthen the time of year that you can use the garden. On an aesthetic level, it will determine how you interact with your garden from the inside at night time. Try and find opportunities to light from the side, or above, just as you would your interior. Think how many lights you need, and then double it. Have them put on different circuits to create different atmospheres. Choose to highlight specific features. Use a variety of lighting, everything from candles to spotlights. The results will be sensational.

    Make it warm.

    Nobody wants to sit in a cold space. Whether you choose infrared heaters, gas furnace for a plain old fire (my personal favourite) consider how you are going to keep people cosy. Adding a heat source to the space will extend how long you can use the garden. In order to create your own outdoor garden room, it is essential to go to town with heat.

    Soften the space.

    Treat all furniture outside as you would inside. Dress opposite the throat and statisticians for an instant relaxed look. Make it inviting, and cushions. Lots of them. Take the opportunity to introduce different textures as a consequence the space will gain depth and layers. This is a great way to introduce different colours as well. One year you may wish to have hot and spicy colours with a Moroccan influence. The next year, cool blues might be your thing. By dressing your furniture you will make a space cosy and inviting.

    Play with texture

    If you want to add depth of interest, add texture. Mix it up. The rough with this move, hard and soft. Whether to meet is where the drama sits. Push the boundaries, include things you wouldn’t normally see Elsewhere outside. Use your outdoor garden room to be playful. Natural textures such as rocks and pebbles will create warmth and ground space, while high-gloss finishes such as glazed pots create a bold statement. Plants will also introduce texture to the space. Ferns and blossoms will provide the softness and give The illusion offilling the space. For something a bit heavier try hydrangeas, magnolias and hostas.

    Over accessorise.

    Very often having too many knickknacks and crowd out and interior space. In the garden put things into themes, or small groupings for them to really pack a punch. Because the space is so much larger, you can use accessories to create within the space. Repeat them at various intervals round the garden. I had literally is small groups or groups of three is in a straight line. Mix up the styles, swap them around.

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  • Where art meets garden design. 12 knockout Garden Design Tips

    Photo 12-07-2018, 09 09 58

    Garden design tips can be found in all sorts of places. This week I visited the summer exhibition at the Royal Academy which is celebrating its 250th anniversary of this wonderful annual event. It features contemporary art from a variety of aluminide captain, with inches to spare.
    A riot of styles and before, it is a visual feast. Inspiration comes thick and fast as my camera roll will testify with over 150 photos. All sorts of different media are included and it shows a little in the way of curation into category. I love it’s bonkers, look at me approach.

    I spent over six hours in there with my seven-year-old son Felix. It isn’t until I came away and was looking through the photos that I realised the vast similarities that there are between many of these works and garden design Principles. Therefore, please see below the 12 top garden design tips to get you on the right track with giving your garden principles. Therefore, please see below the 12 top got design tips to get you on the right track when giving your garden a makeover.

    If you don’t know where to start with a garden layout, try simply interlocking a load of squares and rectangles on a sheet of paper. Art deco motifs or Bauhaus architecture is great for this. As soon as you start dividing a shape, pathways, patios, planting and Lawn areas start to form. Flow and rhytmn will increase through the space as the shapes intersect. In this linocut by Paul Catherall, he uses the bold brutalist architecture of the Haywood Gallery in London Southbank to create series of very blocky colourful shapes. In our modern Japanese gardens from 2012, series of rectangles placed on an angle intersected to carve up the garden into various areas. It’s a great technique. Very simple. Very effective

    Create movement and flow in the garden by interlocking shapes

    Create movement and flow in the garden by interlocking shapes

     

    Garden Design Tip #2: Accentuate the lines by repeating them

    When I was a kid, are used to love going around my drawings for the black felt tip pen. It made them stand out and they were much bolder. It’s a trick I often use with my designs. Repeating the shape by going around it with different materials works well for modern garden design. Edge a patio with setts, plant a tree in a circle, Use archway is in the same shape as the pathway alive. Using repetition creates with them, accentuates your design and makes a much bolder statement.
    In this piece of work, ‘Corrections, the High Line #64’ We see artistLouise Langgard use repeat different coloured lines to create depth and accentuate the rectangle. We include a similar technique in Essex garden design by using circular archway is that mirrored the circular lawns and semicircular stepping stone pathway.

    Repeat the shape to accentuate the lines of the design

    Repeat the shape to accentuate the lines of the design


    Garden Design Tip #3: Create surprise and intrigue

    There is nothing like surprise intrigued to add a little excitement to space. Pop in a few unexpected surprises, twists and turns or quirky personalised elements to keep the garden fresh and interesting. Create hidden areas, unusual planting or optical illusions. This fabulous sculpture by Rana Begum ‘NO.755 2017’ totally captured A playful spirit. The colours changed as you moved across the piece. Really simple, and totally perfect for lifting the idea to replicate in a garden space.

    We created hidden areas by using a variety of screens drawing people into the space

    We created hidden areas by using a variety of screens drawing people into the space


    Garden Design Tip #4: Use colour well

    Colour is key in any design. Used well it can make or break a garden. Work it into your hard landscaping and you don’t need to rely on planting to provide year round zing. It alters the mood of the space. It is instantly responsive and tells you where the garden is pitched emotionally. The bright zingy walls screamed summer in the main exhibition space. An unusual choice for gallery walls it immediately transformed the room intom a funspace, breaking with convention and rules.

    The bright yellow walls filled the room with fun, much like the blues and yellows in our Frida Kahlo garden

    The bright yellow walls filled the room with fun, much like the blues and yellows in our Frida Kahlo garden

     

    Garden Design Tip #5: Be playful

    Gardens should be playful. For most people they can be hugely nostalgic and many first memories are made in gardens. Whether it is a swing under a tree, a quirky water feature or secret hideaway, they offer us the opportunity to become children again like no other space within our homes that we inhabit. Try and include something in your space that allows you to access your inner child. Debbie Lawson does this beautifully with her carpet and mixed media sculpture ‘Red Bear’. We created a standing water feature in an urban setting, that was an ascetic treat, but also fabulous fun for children to padde in.

    Add a playful fun element to your garden to release your inner child

    Add a playful fun element to your garden to release your inner child


    Garden Design Tip #6: Texture and more texture

    Texture is often overlooked in garden design. Where rough meets smooth, shiny meets matt, soft meets hard is where excitement happens. This fabulous sculpture “Rufus 3rd” by Timothy Blewitt is fabulously fun and packed full of texture. We mixed up the textures in flooring in our Walthamstow courtyard garden laying paving next rough stones. Pack your garden full of texture wherever you can It adds an extra sensory delight as you can see texture as well as touch it.

    Five sculpture of a poodle made from costume jewellery is packed full of texture.

    Five sculpture of a poodle made from costume jewellery is packed full of texture.


    Garden Design Tip #7: Scale it up

    this amazing sculpture is what Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos jaw dropping dominate. Scaling things up in our Walthamstow courtyard garden also had a similar effect

    this amazing sculpture is what Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos jaw dropping dominate. Scaling things up in our Walthamstow courtyard garden also had a similar effect


    Garden Design Tip #8: Reflection

    The age old trick of reflection works every time.

    The age old trick of reflection works every time.

     

    Garden Design Tip #9: Be a rule breaker

    Be cheeky. Be controversial. Be new. It gets you noticed

    Be cheeky. Be controversial. Be new. It gets you noticed

     

    Garden Design Tip #10: Repeat, repeat, repeat

    Repeating things, even if they are not identical makes a design stronger

    Repeating things, even if they are not identical makes a design stronger

     

    Garden Design Tip #11: Redefine materials

    Great use of material can enliven any design. Tin cans were used in this sculpture and we put a chain curtain in the garden.

    Great use of material can enliven any design. Tin cans were used in this sculpture and we put a chain curtain in the garden.

     

    Garden Design Tip #12: Divide it up

    Dividing the space up into smaller areas is a great trick for helping to make it seem larger

    Dividing the space up into smaller areas is a great trick for helping to make it seem larger

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  • featuredImage.jpg

    A calm sanctuary garden design in Walthamstow

    We were called in to look at a garden design in Walthamstow. These clients have lived in the house for 18 years and have done little to the garden other than maintain it. It has a large beach hedge down the left hand side which dominates this space. The railway line runs across the back of the space.The client enjoys the conservatory on the back of the property and wishes to improve the view out to the garden.

    Walthamstow Garden in need of a makeover

    Walthamstow Garden in need of a makeover


    The Brief

    The clients have lived in their house for several years and are slowly undertaking renovations throughout the property. They enjoy sitting in their conservatory and looking out over the garden. There is a substantial level difference between the house interior and the garden, which needs to be addressed to allow easy access between the two. The clients would like the new design to include storage. The mature beech hedge needs removing and new fences installed around all boundaries.

    Garden sketch for a calm sanctuary garden in Walthamstow

    Garden sketch for a calm sanctuary garden in Walthamstow

     

     

    The decking area

    A deck constructed from Yellow Balau hardwood boards will be installed directly adjoining the conservatory, flush with the existing back door. A stainless steel tension wire and rail system gives protection from falling over the edge while giving the space an open aspect.

    A large decking area allows for outside dining in this garden design in Walthamstow

    A large decking area allows for outside dining in this garden design in Walthamstow


    A pathway down the garden

    The deck steps down to a raised pathway comprising paving slab stepping stones in a gravel infill, retained in a railway sleeper edge. This path will in turn step down to a second paved path running parallel to the house, before dog legging to lead down to a shed in the bottom right hand corner of the garden.

    A series of pathways in different materials work their way down the garden

    A series of pathways in different materials work their way down the garden


    A new fence

    ‘Hit and miss’ timber fences will be installed around the boundaries to provide an attractive backdrop to the garden.

    A new fence down the left hand side replaces the existing beach hedge

    A new fence down the left hand side replaces the existing beach hedge


    A calm planting scheme

    The planting will be a mixture of shrubs and herbaceous perennials with a focus on texture and form. Primarily a white and green colour scheme containing grasses for movement and long flowering perennials to provide seasonal year round interest.

    Calm planting scheme features soft ferns and white blooms

    Calm planting scheme features soft ferns and white blooms

    If you would like to see the rest of the drawings, visuals and progress of the build with this garden design and Walthamstow please visit our Facebook album ‘Sanctuary garden design in Walthamstow’ or How Pinterest board “Sanctuary garden in Walthamstow”. If you would like us to come and view your garden and transform it into something magical, please get in touch at info@earthdesigns.co.uk

    Influences in this garden come in the form of Bauhaus architecture, art deco rings, and Rousseau paintings

    Influences in this garden come in the form of Bauhaus architecture, art deco rings, and Rousseau paintings

     

    Shades of green against strong lines in various materials for the main design elements in this garden design in Walthamstow

    Shades of green against strong lines in various materials for the main design elements in this garden design in Walthamstow

     

    Changes of direction help to widen this long thin garden design in Walthamstow

    Changes of direction help to widen this long thin garden design in Walthamstow

     

    A mixture of materials and strong lines of softened with a calm planting scheme

    A mixture of materials and strong lines of softened with a calm planting scheme

     

    Soft greens, and white blooms create a calm sanctuary of planting

    Soft greens, and white blooms create a calm sanctuary of planting

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  • Smaller-species-were-suggested-for-the-space.jpg

    Leigh on Sea Landscaper called in to spruce it up.

    Chris contacted us as she was looking for a Leigh on Sea landscaper. She had had her garden renovated several years ago and was now looking to update her planting scheme.

    The layout of the garden works well

    The layout of the garden works well


    The layout

    The framework for the garden works well. The circle of lawn is well kept and the sweeping pathway in long setts just needed a bit of a tidy up. The limestone needed cleaning, and re-sealing to prevent algae buildup.

    The terrace gets dirty easily with a build up of alge

    The terrace gets dirty easily with a build up of alge


    The bottom of the garden

    She wanted to increase privacy on the left hand side of the garden as the row of houses overlooked the space. New planting was also needed to be introduced along the back wall.

    Smaller species were requested.

    Smaller species were requested.


    Planting

    Much of the foliage she had in the garden had become too big for the beds, and the lavender also become a little leggy. The property was right on the seafront, so the planting need to be tolerant of sea air.Chris was a keen Gardner, but travelled a lot with work so the scheme need to be low maintenance. She wanted to include different leaf shape, texture and colour.

    Plants had grown too big for the beds and needed replacing

    Plants had grown too big for the beds and needed replacing


    The Front Garden

    She also wanted Earth Designs to look at the front garden. She had a Leigh on Sea landscasper come into to maintain the beds, but they were inhertited plants and she wasn’t fond of them. Again the plants needed to tolerate sea air and look good all year round. Leaf shape, texture and colour were important to provide interest without too much faff.

    The front garden needed to up the ante

    The front garden needed to up the ante

    We delivered two planting schemes to Chris and our Leigh on Sea Landscaper provided her with a scope fo works to help rennovate the space and give it a face lift.

    Plants full of form and texture to fill the front

    Plants full of form and texture to fill the front

     

    Smaller species were suggested for the space

    Smaller species were suggested for the space

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  • A-wide-fan-lawn-fills-the-space-in-this-garden-design.jpg

    Seeds of design: Fashioning garden design inspiration

    I believe there absolutely has to be great garden design inspiration. None more so than this fabulous Balenciaga exhibition held in 2017 at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

    The seed of inspiration

    The quality of the exhibition bowled me over. Cristóbal Balenciaga’s Spanish heritage influenced many of his iconic designs. His wide-hipped dresses from the late 1930s drew on the portraiture of artist Diego Velázquez. Flamenco dresses, matador outfits and black lace feature heavily. In the 1950s, he began pioneering new shapes never before seen in women’s fashion. None more so than in this fabulous ballgown from the 1950s. A huge, dramatic full skirt from waist to floor and a wraparound shawl, covers the arms. Balenciaga is considered the master of inspiration, cut, shape and materials.

    Balenciaga dress. Perfect garden design inspiration

    A Balenciaga dress. Perfect garden design inspiration

    The garden design bud

    This garden is bold. Similar to Balenciaga’s one scene dress, it mixes the component parts of the ballgown. A huge fan of lawn fills the space, offering a welcoming space for all the family to enjoy. The main patio is shown as a crossover in black slate on limestone. Where the two lines meet, details could be added. It thrusts out into the lawn creating a wonderful platform for entertaining. The planting is stylish and mixed, focusing on form and shape, it is strong and architectural. While not being complex, the planting provides enough interest to keep the eye moving in anticipation.

    Wide fan lawn garden design inspiration

    A wide, fan lawn fills the space in this garden design

    Other design influences

    The dress reminds me of latticework. A warp-and-weft woven material is also an influence. The spread of the hand fan reminds me of the lawn whilst a iconic 60s glass-top table again features the same shapes.

    influences here include warp and weft weave, fans and lattice pies

    Influences include warp-and-weft weave, fans… and lattice pies, yum!

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  • Kodama-Zomes-Swings

    In the Shedquarters – Kodama Zomes garden furniture makes a statement

    Garden furniture can make or break garden design. It immediately identifies where in the garden you would like to spend time. Quality pieces of furniture elevate a space with jawdropping results. And none more so with these fabulous swing chairs from Kodama Zomes.

    Garden furniture that really makes a statement

    Garden furniture that really makes a statement


    Making a statement

    Adding in a cracking piece of furniture can take your garden to the next level. None more so than Kodama Zomes’ revolutionary hammock. Bold and inviting, it allows you to customise your own design and choose which fabric, in which colour you may prefer. Fabulous for injecting some colour into the space or keeping classic and neutral with grey and brown tones that are on offer.

    Furniture as art

    It is no secret that many gardens require a focal point, often in the form of water features or specimen plants. In a small garden however, sometimes things need to be multipurpose, and with a product such as this, it can really turn things around. Attention grabbing, and yet hugely practical, it claims to comfortably fit 4 adults. These geodesic dome is our naturally found in geometry and I’m known for their strength.They are quite large, so may require a dedicated hard surface water themselves. Often positioned on the large trees, this may be preclusive in a small space. However, if you fancy extra bit of wham bam do your space, this could be well worth it.

    Healing properties

    I’m like hammocks, the current Dharma zones handsome one overhead points, thereby creating an unrestricted motion. This claims to soothe the vestibular system. I think this is perfect for family garden, where the children, and the child in all adults, can enjoy the swinging motion either alone, Or with company.Customer is claiming that children have used it as a jungle gym, a fort, a tent and even used it for sleepovers.

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  • Leigh-on-Sea garden designer gives young family a modern space

    Hannah was looking for a Leigh-on-Sea garden designer. She had a small budget but wanted to turn her garden into a more useable space for her family. Katrina worked with her to deliver the solution.

    Leigh-on-Sea Garden Designer needed for overhaul

    Leigh on Sea Garden Designer needed for overhaul


    The Leigh-on-Sea garden designer brief

    The clients have decorated the interior of their family home beautifully and are now turning their attention to the exterior space. They wish to create a garden which caters to the whole family, with provision for socialising, relaxation and play for the children. Their budget is limited, so although they wish to maximise the use of the space they are prepared to undertake the project in stages if necessary. The garden is east facing so is fairly shady down the right hand side throughout the day.

    The Leigh-on-Sea garden designer proposal

    The garden sketch proposal


    Maximising the space

    The layout of this design is intended to make the most of the sun throughout the day. A gravel path leads from the back door to a large sandstone patio on the left hand side of the garden. The patio will be framed by a wall of large fibreglass planters around the right hand corner to screen the area from the rest of the garden and providing a block of colour.

    Maximising the sun

    Maximising the sun


    Pathways

    A gravel pathway will lead up the left hand side of the garden to a second patio spanning the width of the space at the back. This patio will be covered by a timber pergola which will allow for the addition of a hammock or swing, or for drapes to create for a den space.

    Journey through the space

    Journey through the space


    Changes in levels

    A low raised bed constructed from new railway sleepers that once the bed runs down the right hand side of the garden to cope with the level change in the space. The centre of the garden will feature a large artificial lawn. The fences will be replaced as necessary (along the rear boundary) and clad all round with horizontal softwood slats. The shed, pergola and boundary cladding will be painted in dark grey to create a uniform and stylish backdrop to the space.

    A railway sleeper bed down the right side to cope with level change

    A railway sleeper bed down the right side to cope with level change


    Planting

    The planting scheme focuses on red tones, mixing evergreen shrubs alongside long flowering herbaceous perennials.

    Planting is bold and features red accents

    Planting is bold and features red accents

    If you live in Essex and are looking for a Leigh on Sea garden designer please do get in touch

    Strong pergola structure and blocky shapes form the backbone of the space

    Strong pergola structure and blocky shapes form the backbone of the space

     

    Inspiration comes from  Escher, Rothko and Brutalism.

    Inspiration comes from Escher, Rothko and Brutalism.

    A scale garden plan from our Leigh on Sea garden designer

    A scale garden plan from our Leigh on Sea garden designer

    Dark fences make the reds and green pop out

    Dark fences make the reds and green pop out

     

     

    Planting includes punchy reds, zingy limes and plenty of evergreens.

    Planting includes punchy reds, zingy limes and plenty of evergreens.

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  • Garden design hotline #11: Walthamstow garden design rings the changes

    This client called Earth Designs as they were looking for a Walthamstow garden design. They had recently bought a property in E17, and wanted to make the most of the garden as it was the first time they had had one. She had a love of art deco and wanted to employ curves in the space. It was a self build, as her dad had offered to help, but she wanted some expertise and advice from Katrina before they started.

    Going round in circles in this Walthamstow Garden Design

     

    Circles

    Katrina worked with the aspect of the garden (East facing) and placed two circles in the space where the sun hit the garden. She proposed circles could be paved with linear paving cut to shape, or the client could use a page circle kit. The direction of the paving was to flow in different directions to create contrast and inject energy into the space.

    Art deco garden

    Working with the motif of circles in this Walthamstow garden design, Katrina emphasised this by proposing a planting bed to offset the paved patio. By echoing the shape, it creates repeat and rhythm. Very common in deco language.

    Garden path

    Essentially most garden require a pathway taking the user from one end to the other. It is an opportunity to have some fun. A sense of journey was created, by the addition of some archways over the pathway. This then provides the opportunity for some scented climbers as well as great garden lighting. That creates a feeling of moving from one space or atmosphere to the next.

    Hideout

    Katrina proposed a fun, “sit soft” area at the bottom of the garden. Masked by planting, this area was to be a great space for entertaining and parties. Circular sofas could be included placed around a fire pit for nighttime fun.

    Existing tree

    The client had a large existing apple tree in the garden. This added a sense of maturity to the space and Katrina was reluctant to remove it. It gave structure and privacy to the garden. There was a large area behind it, which Katrina proposed could be utilised as a space to hang an adult swing.

    Screening it

    Layering up gardens by using screens of any sort always makes for great dramatic effect. In this Walthamstow garden design, Katrina proposed laser cut screens (In an art deco motif) to screen the area at the back and create height and intrigue.

    Book your free garden design consultation now by contacting Katrina and Matt on 01702 597587 or email us at info@earthdesigns.co.uk.

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    Chalkwell garden design transforms space

    This Chalkwell garden design needs to transform the space. Not only was it a family garden, but Both clients wanted to work from home. One currently has a workshop for her jewellery design business in the garden, and that needs to remain.

    This Chalkwell Garden needs to take a lot of boxes

    This Chalkwell Garden needs to take a lot of boxes

     

     

    The Brief

    The interior of this large detached property has been extensively renovated and the clients are now turning their attention to the garden. One of the clients is a jewellery designer who currently works in a workshop space at the back of the garden. The other would like to work from home more frequently. Therefore they require a new garden office cum workspace large enough to accommodate their needs. They also have two young children so provision for them in the garden would be desirable. Both clients are avid chefs and are keen to create a traditional space with a contemporary twist, that focuses on entertaining and cooking fabulous cuisine. They want to use traditional space with a contemporary twist. The steep level change in the existing decking is very steep, making it difficult to get from the house level to the lower garden, which should be addressed in the redesign.

    Dividing the area into zones creates space for everyone

    Dividing the area into zones creates space for everyone


    Italian inspiration.

    The design takes inspiration from the client’s Italian heritage . The overall footprint of the existing decking will remain the same, although the height will be raised so that there is a single step down from the main patio doors. The location of the steps will be moved to the left hand side of the garden and made shallower to enable an easier transition to the lower garden. The existing framework with be modified as necessary and the boards replaced with smooth Yellow Balau hardwood planks.

    Tall cypressa sempervirens are the epitome of Italian gardens

    Tall cypressa sempervirens are the epitome of Italian gardens

     

    A raised deck

    A new balustrade, constructed from Yellow Balau hardwood posts and rail with horizontal stainless steel tension wire infill, will be installed around the front edge of the deck to allow a clearer view of the garden beyond. Two grey Perspex panels on the left hand side will give an attractive draft backdrop to a landing area halfway down the steps, which will also make a great spot for a collection of pots and planters.

    This Chalkwell Garden design relocates the decking stairs to make it easier to navigate the garden

    This Chalkwell Garden design relocates the decking stairs to make it easier to navigate the garden

     

    The garden office and workshop

    To the left hand side of the lower garden will a large bespoke 10m x 3m garden office structure. The existing conifers will be removed and replaced with a selection of trees with a variety of foliage and texture to create a lighter, less imposing appearance without compromising on privacy.

    The garden office and workshop is relocated to the shadier area in the garden

    The garden office and workshop is relocated to the shadier area in the garden

     

    Extra storage

    The front of the decking platform will be clad with Cor-Ten weathered steel panels, with Yellow Balau doors installed at intervals to allow access beneath the decking for storage. The centre of the garden will feature a lawn with Cor-Ten steel edging. A pathway, laid with travertine effect porcelain tiles will run across the garden from the decking steps, then up the garden to a large patio in the bottom right side of the space.

    The void space under the decking is put to good use with extra storage allocation

    The void space under the decking is put to good use with extra storage allocation

     

    Outdoor kitchen

    The main focus of the garden will be a large bespoke outdoor kitchen installed on the rear patio. This will comprise a barbecue, sink, chiller/fridge, food preparation area, gas hobs and pizza oven to provide the client with a versatile and comprehensive outdoor cooking area. A large railway sleeper table and bench seats in the centre of the patio will give ample opportunity for dining and entertaining. Cor-Ten steel troughs installed down the centre of the table will allow the client to grow culinary herbs and give ice bucket full shilling drinks on a hot summers day. A flat top tree planted installed through the centre of the table will serve as an unusual and eye-catching canopy.

    A fabulous bespoke kitchen creates maximum alfresco dining

    A fabulous bespoke kitchen creates maximum alfresco dining

     

    Children’s play area

    An artificial lawn installed in the back left of the garden will serve as a children’s play area, with a large slide installed over the central planting bed to the main lawn beyond. The paved pathway will return along the front of the garden office, framed by a series of timber arches. The existing fences to the right of the space will be replaced with decorative ‘hit and miss’ fencing.
    The main planting beds will contain a selection of evergreen shrubs, herbaceous perennials and tall translucent grasses to delineate the space and create a sense of movement. A planting bed to the right of the space will be packed full of herbs and espalier fruit trees. The back boundary of the space will be front planted with pleached evergreen trees to provide aesthetically appealing screening.

    Children’s play area is located behind plants

    Children’s play area is located behind plants

    If you would like to see how this project develops please keep your eye on the Facebook page ‘garden design for all the family’ or to see what inspired this project you can follow the board on Pinterest ‘Chalkwell garden design’. If you live in London, Essex or the south-east and would like a garden design and build, please do get in touch at info@earthdesigns.co.uk

    Some great inspiration here ranging from Bauhaus architecture, Alexander McQueen dresses and Kubus Tupperware

    Some great inspiration here ranging from Bauhaus architecture, Alexander McQueen dresses and Kubus Tupperware

     

    So much going on in this in talion inspired garden

    So much going on in this in talion inspired garden

    The scale plan details the Garden layout

    The scale plan details the Garden layout

    Visualisations drawn onto CAD help the client to see The garden layout

    Visualisations drawn onto CAD help the client to see The garden layout

    Plants in the garden feature a lot of edible species

    Plants in the garden feature a lot of edible species

     

     

     

     

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  • erbu8
August small contemporary urban garden outdoor living entertaining Frieda Kahlo inspired.
Owner: Erin Bunting. Design: Earth Designs
Leytonstone, London
UK
Marcus Harpur

    How to plan the perfect urban garden design in seven easy steps

    Top tips for the perfect urban garden design

    As a London garden designer I mainly work in urban garden design. Over the years and I have learnt several great tips for creating space in the garden, and giving it that all important designer age. When space is tight, you need to make sure you go delivering top-notch in all areas. Here I share some top tips for you to copy in your own space to make it a showstopper you dream of.

    Garden Boundaries

    It seems obvious, but the larger surface area in most small gardens will be perimeters. They can be very difficult to hide. Most shrubs will be too bulky, and sometimes climbers to leggy. If your fences are in a state of disrepair, need to address this. Consider painting fences dark (bright colours will attract attention), cladding them with timber, Perspex or metal. Dark colours will recede, and the planting in front of them will pop out. Trawl Pinterest for inspiration.

    Add colour to your garden

    It can be transformative. I try not to rely on your planting if you want to colour. Many of the winter flowering plants are not desperately interesting the rest of the year, if you are tight on space really need the space in the garden. Consider painting one wall, addingcolourful pots, or other bright accessories. Wall colour can easily be changed as can pots so you can create a very different look for a fraction of the cost further down the line should you fancy a revamp.

    Zoning the garden

    By breaking the golden into small areas, actually be larger. You screens to divide it up and create secret hideout’s, calm spaces for single use. A space to linger and rest well. Try to avoid being able to walk from one end of the garden to the other in a straight line. You can give a different vibe to each area by the planting you select. Cosy up a small space urban garden design by placing a tree to create canopy, add scented clothes to socialising space for that extra dimension.

    Use found objects

    Add personality to the space I think using optical salvage, or objects that you don’t usually associate with gardens to add a real dose of personality to the space. Try old kitchen ephermera for planters, don’t be frightened to bring interior furniture outside on a fine day, old bicycle on the wall for a climber to scramble through.

    Proportion

    Oversize something. Add a giant pot with a huge plant. Hang a large outdoor canvas on the boundary. Select a very decadently sized lounger. It makes the space edgy and cool. It creates magic.

    Follow the hard landscaping lines.

    It may seem a really simple thing to say, but consider what way you lay new paving or decking. Making it parallel to the house on the long thin garden widens the space. You want to create an optical illusion so use the lines that naturally fall within hard landscaping. Twist the paving 45° For added interest.

    Make your furniture part of the framework

    Integrating new seating can be hugely beneficial in small space. When spaces toilet, fixing down seating helps with efficiency. Attaching the bench to raise bed creates instant okey texture of interest and a framework for simple seating options, from the daybed to bench seat.

     

     

     

     

     

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